Law is War authors, Amy and Jag, were asked to help write a briefing document being compiled by Defend the Right to Protest to coincide with a two day workshop hosted by the UN Special Rappoteur, Maina Kiai, in Kenya on litigating people’s rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.  The aim of the draft briefing was […]

It is easy to remain dubious over the efficacy of well-stewarded A-to-B protest marches, and I certainly felt pangs of apprehension as the march for Gaza set off from the Israeli Embassy yesterday (26th July 2014) – already hemmed in by barriers, stewards informed those not behind the organisers’ lead banners which side of the […]

I recently wrote about the right to claim asylum on the grounds of conscientious objection, and developments towards the recognition of a right to conscientious objection more broadly.  My article was published in Volume 5 of the King’s Student Law Review. Abstract: Conscientious objection has had a complicated history, and its legal position within both international and domestic […]

See my previous posts on this case here, and the Police Spies Out of Lives campaign website here. The ongoing ‘spycops’ litigation continued this week in the High Court, as a group of the victim claimants asked the court to order the Metropolitan Police to file a proper defence to their legal claim.  Despite abandoning […]

In an unexpected and welcomed move the Met yesterday announced that it will no longer attempt to strike out claims brought by five women in respect of the undercover police officers who deceived them into sexual relationships. I have previously written about the ongoing #spycops saga here, here, and here. The claimants had brought civil […]

Last night the House of Lords rejected by a majority of 128 the Government’s proposed Anti-social Behavour, Crime and Policing Bill (pdf). Aspects of the Bill were intended to replace Labour’s highly controversial Anti-social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) with a new system of Injunctions to Prevent Nuisance and Annoyance (IPNAs), and essentially represented an exaggeration of […]

Protest On 7th April 2012 Trenton Oldfield, a 37 year old Australian who has lived in the UK for over a decade, temporarily disrupted the Oxford v Cambridge Boat Race.  He did so not out of hatred for the individuals in the boats but in protest against elitism and “the astounding and entirely unnecessary levels […]

Free Public Lecture organised by Queen Mary Institute of Computer & Communications Law (ICCL), in association with Law is War. Thursday 21st November – 6:30 – 8pm Venue: Centre for Commercial Law Studies, Queen Mary, UoL, 67-69 Lincoln’s Inn Fields Free event but limited places, book online at: privacynotprism.eventbrite.co.uk Edward Snowden has revealed the shocking extent to […]

The Court of Appeal yesterday ruled on the ‘spycops’ appeal which was heard in October.  I previously wrote about the appeal here  and commented on the undercover policing revelations in general here. The case is a complex one; there are essentially two sets of claims being brought by eight Claimants represented by two law firms.  The […]

Not having a TV, I missed Russell Brand’s Newsnight interview when it first aired, but with what feels like the whole world currently singing Brand’s praises (and the ‘R’ word being liberally flung about), I thought I’d better see what all the fuss was about. I applaud Brand, and any celebrity for that matter (Benedict Cumberbatch, Dominic […]