Tag Archives: human rights

UKHIP’s Calais Flotilla: Donations & Evictions

On 28th March UKHIP’s flotilla of solidarity made its way to Calais in a convoy which included a van full of donations – both given and bought with the funds raised by the crowdfunding campaign. Spirits were high as we made our way to the coast, two months of preparation finally coming together, but in […]

Life in the ‘Jungles’ of Calais

Yesterday, myself and five others got up early, left our homes and made our way to Calais. Unlike many others making this trip from the UK, we were not on a booze cruise or European road trip. Instead, we were travelling with all the warm winter donations we could squeeze into six backpacks and heading […]

‘No Comment’ – Two Big Words

In an age of intelligence-led policing, ‘no comment’ is of fundamental importance. Police, especially insidious Police Liaison Officers, use our innate human dispensation towards communication against those who dare to dissent; orders/questions barked out by agents of the state carry with them an implied threat of punishment for refusal. This provides police with an all-too-easy strategy for […]

Asylum for Refusing to Fight: Charting the Development Towards the Right to Conscientious Objection

I recently wrote about the right to claim asylum on the grounds of conscientious objection, and developments towards the recognition of a right to conscientious objection more broadly.  My article was published in Volume 5 of the King’s Student Law Review. Abstract: Conscientious objection has had a complicated history, and its legal position within both international and domestic […]

#spycops victims seek end to Police’s ‘NCND’ wall of silence

See my previous posts on this case here, and the Police Spies Out of Lives campaign website here. The ongoing ‘spycops’ litigation continued this week in the High Court, as a group of the victim claimants asked the court to order the Metropolitan Police to file a proper defence to their legal claim.  Despite abandoning […]

Police abandon #spycops strike-out

In an unexpected and welcomed move the Met yesterday announced that it will no longer attempt to strike out claims brought by five women in respect of the undercover police officers who deceived them into sexual relationships. I have previously written about the ongoing #spycops saga here, here, and here. The claimants had brought civil […]

“Super-ASBO” IPNAs rejected by House of Lords

Last night the House of Lords rejected by a majority of 128 the Government’s proposed Anti-social Behavour, Crime and Policing Bill (pdf). Aspects of the Bill were intended to replace Labour’s highly controversial Anti-social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) with a new system of Injunctions to Prevent Nuisance and Annoyance (IPNAs), and essentially represented an exaggeration of […]

Trenton Oldfield: imprisoned for non-violent direct action, now facing deportation

Protest On 7th April 2012 Trenton Oldfield, a 37 year old Australian who has lived in the UK for over a decade, temporarily disrupted the Oxford v Cambridge Boat Race.  He did so not out of hatred for the individuals in the boats but in protest against elitism and “the astounding and entirely unnecessary levels […]

Privacy not Prism – Free Public Lecture

Free Public Lecture organised by Queen Mary Institute of Computer & Communications Law (ICCL), in association with Law is War. Thursday 21st November – 6:30 – 8pm Venue: Centre for Commercial Law Studies, Queen Mary, UoL, 67-69 Lincoln’s Inn Fields Free event but limited places, book online at: privacynotprism.eventbrite.co.uk Edward Snowden has revealed the shocking extent to […]

Spycops Appeal: Partial Victory

The Court of Appeal yesterday ruled on the ‘spycops’ appeal which was heard in October.  I previously wrote about the appeal here  and commented on the undercover policing revelations in general here. The case is a complex one; there are essentially two sets of claims being brought by eight Claimants represented by two law firms.  The […]